Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality & Safety seeking submissions. Might the recruitment & staffing sector bring something fresh to the table?

Aged Care CommissionThe Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality & Safety continues to seek submissions to its December 2019 Consultation Paper.  Submissions can now be made until the end of April 2020.

The  January closing date, as originally proposed, was awful, with many people distracted by holidays, bushfires, storms, floods and return to schol.  But the Royal Commission has recently indicated that it will accept submisisons until the end of April. So, there might still be time to engage!

It would be marvellous to hear what contribution the recruitment and staffing sector could make to the design of a more effective aged care workforce.

That’s because one of the key questions on which submisisons are being sought is:

How could the aged care and health systems work together to deliver care which better meets the complex health needs of older people, including dementia care as well as palliative and end of life care? What are the best models for these forms of care?

It’s an important question. Sadly, the Consultation Paper puts it in the context of numerous system deficiencies.

[The current system] struggles to attract and retain sufficient numbers of skilled, knowledgeable and competent staff (p.3).

…low levels of clinical staff and personal carers in residential care and poor interfaces with the health system mean that some people may not receive the level of nursing, allied health and personal care services they need and would otherwise have had access to within the community or from the health system. (p.13).

The majority of staff are personal care workers rather than nurses or allied health professionals.  (p.14).

The delivery of services to rural and remote geographical regions in Australia is complex and differs for every community. It is impacted by multiple socioeconomic factors and the physical environment, such as the high cost of goods, utilities, transport, fuel, food and vehicles. There is often limited access to most government services and a shortage of staff to support those services. (p.18).

I reckon it would make a huge difference to address the challenge of designing a better aged care workforce from the perspective of appreciating the resources we do have. And in that context, it would be marvellous to hear about the solutions that innovative and resourceful staffing & recruitment professionals could suggest!

So, I’d like urge the recruitment and staffing sector to engage with the questions that are being asked and see if there’s something fresh that can be brought to the table – befitting “Leaders in the World of Work”.

How about it?

 

Andrew C. Wood

“Tuesday TalkAbout” Summer 2020 Program to Address Recruitment & Staffing Sector “Waypoints”

Tuesday TalkAbout takes a new direction for its Summer 2020 Program of free, short webinars, as we discuss some larger themes at work in the recruitment and staffing sector.

Now, I certainly don’t claim to be a seer or a futurist. I observe and interpret. So, I’m not going to attempt to predict the course of the decade or anything like that.

Instead, I’ll describe the “waypoints”, which I think the recruitment & staffing sector in Australia and New Zealand has reached in eight key areas. ‘

A “waypoint” can be understood as a place on a route or pathway, a stopping point, or a point at which one’s course can be changed.

What the future holds from that point forward largely flows from the decisions and commitments which recruitment & staffing professionals make for their own organisations and professional lives – either intentionally or by default.

The observations and insights that I hope to share reflect experience gained over four decades in legal and workforce consulting practice and in recent work done with RCSA, designing its new Code for Professional Conduct, its grievance intervention guidelines & protocols, its StaffSure certification program, and many of its key resources and templates.

The eight key areas we’ll be discussing are:

1. Professional Conduct (21st January)

RCSA’s new Code for Professional Conduct has been authorised by the ACCC to commence on 8 August 2020. How is it different from previous codes or other industry codes? Why is it different? What statement does it make about emerging professionalism? How might recruitment & staffing professionals respond to it? How is it enforced and administered?

Register for the Professional Conduct “Waypoint” webinar here

2. Quality Management (28th January)

What does “quality” mean in the context of the work undertaken by recruitment & staffing professionals as labour market enablers and intermediaries. Does the ISO 9001 definition of “quality” say it all? How well does the “customer focus” requirement stand up to the professional conduct responsibilities of recruitment & staffing professionals? Is quality perceived as outcome or experience? Is it even an either/or question?

Register for the Quality Management “Waypoint” webinar here

3. Risk Management (4th February)

We know (at least I hope we do) that risk is defined for the purposes of risk management and quality management standards as the “effect of uncertainty on objectives”. But how might risk be categorised to be more manageable for recruitment & staffing professionals? What sorts of risk do recruitment & staffing professionals face in 2020? At what points does risk intersect with professionalism and quality? How can risk be managed to minimise its effects on professional and quality objectives?

Register for the Risk Management “Waypoint” webinar here

4. Collaboration (11th February)

What is “collaboration”, really? Why is it important for recruitment & staffing professionals in 2020? Is collaboration possible with customers and clients? Candidates? Competitors? Consultants? If so, how is achieved? How is it managed and maintained?

Register for the Collaboration “Waypoint” webinar here

5. Doing Business (18th February)

Something is wrong if you’re not upgrading your terms of business at least as frequently as your mobile phone! Wonder why you’re getting pushback from clients who won’t pay you that “introduction fee”, or who won’t sign up to your “all-care-no-responsibility” conditions? Terms of business modelled on 1980s recruitment & staffing practices and 1980s legal culture are no longer viable. In this session, we explain why and talk about what you can do about that.

Register for the Doing Business (Terms of Business) “Waypoint” webinar here

6. Conflict & Dispute Resolution (25th February)

Even for those who might be energised by conflict, there comes a point when stocks of energy and finances to meet the crushing cost of feeding conflict, run low. What is your conflict/ dispute profile? Do you still handle business disputes like it’s the 1980s and you’re a bank? Or have you found a better way? What are your options in 2020? What distinguishes the way you handle conflict and disputes as “professional”?

Register for the Conflict & Dispute Resolution “Waypoint” webinar here

7. Employment Shaping (3rd March)

What is the difference between legitimate employment shaping and sham contracting or avoidance? How much flexibility is there to shape an employment relationship to suit labour market conditions in 2020? What are the limits? How do you know if you are approaching or transgressing them? Are there any “golden rules”. If so, what are they and how do you apply them?

Register for the Employment Shaping “Waypoint” webinar here

8. Independent contractor on-hire (10th March)

What are the main challenges to independent contractor on-hire in 2020? Is the business integration test still reliable? What investigations should a recruitment & staffing professional undertake to ensure that independent contractor engagement and on-hire models are compliant with a wide range of regulatory requirements and are not exploitative?

Register for the Independent Contractor On-Hire “Waypoint” webinar here

I do hope you’ll join me when WorkAccord’s Tuesday TalkAbout Summer Program returns at 8:30 am AEDT on Tuesday 21 January 2020 and I’d love to learn of any questions you might have in advance.

 

Andrew C. Wood

Industry Certification Schemes – Regulatory Alternatives?

TT_8 Cwertification Full

Can industry certification schemes be viable alternatives to statutory licensing schemes?

In WorkAccord’s next free Tuesday TalkAbout I’ll discuss different types of certification schemes and consider their pros and cons as regulatory alternatives. In doing so, I’ll also look at Regulatory Impact Statement that supported the Victorian licensing scheme to see how it worked. What assumptions were made? Were they correct? How might a federal RIS and outcome differ?

I hope you’ll join me.

Andrew C. Wood

 

Labour Hire Licensing Laws: Do they apply outside their home states?

ExtraterritorialityQueensland, South Australia, and Victoria have now all passed separate labour hire licensing laws[1].

All three acts contain provisions that attempt to extend their application beyond state boundaries.[2] The exact wording in each case is different but basically, they attempt to extend the laws to the maximum extent of the legislative power of their respective Parliaments. No one knows for sure exactly what that is because it hasn’t been tested in this context. But it seems generally correct to say that, provided there is some real connection (or nexus), with the home state, the laws are capable of applying in some other state (or country). Continue reading

Let’s Shed Light on Recruitment Fees!

 

Slide1Temp-to-Perm Fees, Agency-Switching Fees, Introduction Fees and Release Fees.

I hope you’ll join me when we shed light on the topic of Recruitment Fees in two separate webinars planned for Thursday 22nd November and Thursday 29th November at 10:30 am AEDT.

In our first webinar, you’ll learn how to make binding and enforceable recruitment fee agreements.

In our second webinar, you’ll learn how to manage fee recruitment disputes ethically and professionally.

You can find out more about the webinars in my Recruiters’ Casebook blog here.

 

Andrew C. Wood, Hon FRCSA (Life)

Two Webinars about Recruitment Fees

I’m looking forward to presenting two webinars on recruitment fee topics later this month. I’m looking forward to it because it’s a topic that I’m constantly asked about and one that needs to be mastered in the interests of promoting and maintaining professional standards in the recruitment and staffing industry.

Slide1Webinar #1: Make Binding & Effective Agreements (22nd Nov. 2019 )

In the first session, we will discuss how to make binding and effective recruitment fee agreements that will reduce the cost of disputes and help get your fees paid.

You’ll learn about:

  • basics of contract
  • the battle of forms – Does the client’s purchase order trump your standard terms?
  • traps when using standard form terms of business
  • State and Territory employment agent regulation
  • what happens if your terms of business are not signed?
  • terms of business that need special treatment.

 

RF2Webinar #2: Handle Disputes Ethically & Professionally (29th Nov. 2019)

In the second session, you will learn how to handle recruitment fee disputes professionally and ethically to preserve goodwill, reputation, and to improve payment outcomes.

You’ll learn about:

  • common causes of recruitment fee disputes
  • common defences to recruitment fee claims
  • traps to avoid when involved in disputes
  • RCSA Code of Conduct and Grievance Intervention Guidelines
  • pathways to resolution
  • the benefit of early intervention.

 

I hope you’ll join me. And if you have questions about the topic, please feel free to send them to me ahead of the event.

 

Andrew C. Wood, Hon FRCSA (Life)

 

 

 

Do Victoria’s Christmas Talent Agencies and Incorporated Christmas Talent Need Labour Hire Licences?

This Article May Contain Sensitive Material

For any youthful readers of this piece, let me start by saying that we all know that the real Father Christmas lives at the North Pole with Mother Christmas, the Pixies, Rudolph and the other reindeer.

And we all know that all the friendly people who run around in costume – the Santas, Mothers Christmas (I hope that’s the correct plural), the Pixies, the Wise Persons, Shepherds, Angels, and pantomime camels – let’s call them the Christmas Talent – are just helping out. It could be a franchise, I’m not sure. I haven’t looked at it.

At least, I hope we all know that Christmas Talent is mostly pretend. Nevertheless, it’s always fun to see them because we know that when they start popping up in the stores, Christmas is not too far away.

I’m Concerned

Now here’s my concern.

Up until now, a lot of the Christmas Talent have been sourced through talent agencies. Up until now, that’s not been a problem in Victoria – but now it might be.

It might be a problem because if you’re supplying workers (let’s say Christmas Talent) to another person (let’s say a department store) to perform work in and as part of the store’s business or undertaking (seems likely), then you might need a labour hire licence.

This test is sometimes called an “integration test”. It’s not easy to apply, and it can depend on subtle, fact-sensitive inquiries that can only be determined authoritatively by a court. It can also have some pretty unexpected results.

Queensland & South Australia

Queensland and South Australia got this right because in those States talent agencies are subject to private employment agency regulation in addition to labour hire licensing.

So, Queensland and South Australia both created an exemption from the need to have a labour hire licence if you are acting solely as a private employment agency.[1]

Victoria

But there’s no similar exemption in Victoria. So, if you’re supplying a worker to do work in and as part of another person’s business or undertaking, you’ll possibly need a licence (unless you can bring yourself within one of the other exceptions).

Also in Victoria, if you’re sourcing and placing workers (let’s say Christmas Talent) with clients who are engaging them directly as independent contractors, and you continue to handle payroll or other aspects of the placement administration, you’ll possibly need a licence (unless you can bring yourself within one of the other exceptions).

Incorporated Christmas Talent

It gets even more complicated if your Christmas Talent is self-incorporated – i.e. they’re working through their own small company. That’s because their own small company is supplying the individuals who perform the work and therefore needs to hold a licence in its own right (unless it can bring itself within one of the exceptions).

Fortunately, there is an exception for small companies that have no more than two directors and only supply their directors who participate in management or share in the profits.

But that exception will only go so far. An exempt company couldn’t supply say, Three Wise Men – apart from whatever difficulties they might have in sourcing three wise men (old joke). Two would be OK provided they were both directors who participated in management or shared in the profits.

Likewise, a pantomime camel needs two people (front end and back end). That would be OK provided both ends were directors who participated in management or shared in the profits. But if one end gets sick – they’re going to end up with a two-legged camel unless they’ve got a labour hire licence. That’s because substitution requires a third person.

Same deal with Rudolph. And if you’re thinking of hiring the Von Trapp Family Carol Singers – better check their labour hire licence unless they’re incorporated and you’re only wanting two of them!

Although there’s an exemption for incorporated workers, it doesn’t extend to family partnerships or other unincorporated business structures.[2]

Call Me a Grinch!

I could go on… But you’ll have the gist of it by now, and you can perhaps see the problem that arises when labour-hire licensing is introduced on a universal coverage basis without being targeted to the sectors where it’s really needed.

Did anyone think this would be an outcome when the scheme was proposed? Of course, they didn’t. The States were urged to adopt targeted schemes. The Victorian Forsyth Inquiry even recommended it.  But those urgings and recommendations were mostly ignored.

So if you’re hiring Christmas Talent in Victoria this year or if you’re working as Incorporated Christmas Talent, whatever other checks you do, be sure to check that any necessary labour hire licence issues are covered.

Boy Riding Camel

 

 

 

Andrew C. Wood

 

 

[1] It can get tricky if you’re doing more than acting purely as a private employment agency – say handling payroll or administration.

[2] South Australia fixed this up by Gazettal on 26 September 2019. Although the exemption is still limited to a maximum of two workers.

 

Tuesday TalkAbout: a Free Short Webinar Series

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Some of you may know from earlier posts that I’m currently exploring how positive attitudes towards continuing professional development can support recruitment & staffing practitioners in meeting regulatory and industry requirements to acquire and maintain prescribed levels of relevant professional knowledge. It’s part of my response to RCSA’s #loveyourwork initiative.

So, I’ve put together a series of ten short (30-minute) webinars covering topics of importance and interest to members of the RCSA-hosted Labour  Hire Licensing & Regulation (Aust & NZ) LinkedIn Group, which I moderate.

The webinars have been scheduled, at members’ request, to take place at 8.30 am on a Tuesday. The webinars are presented using the ZOOM webinar platform. You can ask questions anonymously or send them to me ahead of the webinar if you like.

Here’s the program. It has been designed to inform and to encourage discussion amongst members who are keen to advance their continuing professional development.

You can register for the free webinars by following the links provided. I hope you’ll take part!

 

2019 Program

15/10/19 Independent Contractors: Removing the Grey Areas (Completed) (Archived)

Join us for our “Tuesday TalkAbout” webinar when we’ll be shedding light on the topic of independent contracting. What is it, really? How is it different from other work relationships like employment? Why does it matter?

22/10/19 Labour Hire Licensing: Using Conditions to Get Over the Line (Completed) (Archived)

We launch a discussion about how to access the regulators’ power to grant conditional licences and examine actual conditions that have been used to support the grant of licences that might otherwise not have been approved.  

29/10/19 Labour Hire Licensing: Rejections, Appeals & Alternatives (Completed) (Archived)

Our discussion of labour-hire licencing extends into the area of objections, rejections, appeals, and alternatives. We look at some actual objections, suspensions and cancellations and discuss how to deal with them. 

05/11/19 Service Continuity: Tips & Traps for Agency Work (Completed) (Archived)

What is the status of your agency workers between assignments?  Can they accrue long service leave and other service-based entitlements when not working? Has the status been affected by recognition of the so-called permanent-casual?  We examine two common models of agency worker engagement and discuss their pros and cons. 

12/11/19 Casual Conversion: How to Use Evidence-Based Responses (Completed) (Archived)

You will be familiar with casual conversion provisions in awards and agreements. But how do you respond to a casual conversion request? We discuss the type of evidence you can use, how to interpret it, and how you might present it when responding to a casual conversion request. 

19/11/19 Labour Contracting, Supply Chains & Service Networks: Explained (Completed) (Archived)

Although it is common to talk about labour supply chains, there are actually very few situations where it occurs. That’s because labour is different from other commodities. We discuss different models of labour contracting and look at examples of recruitment & staffing agency service networks to see what is really going on. 

26/11/19 Modern Slavery & Vulnerable Worker Protections (Completed) (Archived)

How are you going to respond when your clients ask for a report about what steps you’ve been taking to combat modern slavery and the exploitation of vulnerable workers in their supply chains? We build on our understanding of labour contracting, supply chains and service networks to discuss how you can respond positively to your client’s (and regulators’) requirements. 

03/12/19 Certification Schemes as Regulatory Alternatives: Pros and Cons (Completed) (Archived)

Can industry certification schemes be viable alternatives to statutory licensing schemes? We discuss different types of certification schemes and consider their pros and cons as regulatory alternatives. In doing so, we’ll also look at Regulatory Impact Statement that supported the Victorian licensing scheme to see how it worked. What assumptions were made? Were they correct? How might a federal RIS and outcome differ? 

10/12/19 Freelance Platforms: New Idea or New Technology?

You might have a view about whether freelance platforms present a threat to the industry or whether they are part of the industry. But have you ever looked into their terms and conditions to see how they run and where they fit within the industry? We discuss actual examples of some freelance platform terms and conditions to see how they operate and why they are different from your usual terms and conditions. Register for this webinar here

17/12/19 Piece Rates: Explained

We discuss piece rates under some common awards and consider how to manage risk when applying them. What do courts look for? How can you get that sort of information from your clients? How can you protect yourself against underpayment claims? Register for this webinar here

 

Andrew C Wood Hon FRCSA (Life)

The Recruiters’ Casebook and WorkAccord Get Together for a Free Short Webinar Series

The Recruiters’ Casebook and WorkAccord are getting together to present two free webinars as they test their new webinar platform.

We’d love you to join us and give us your feedback.

Webinar 1

Competition & Consumer Law Brief – The New Playing Field.

Friday, 21 September 2018, 10.00 am to 10.30 am AEST.

Modern Universal Business Concept Icon SetAs job-based employment seemingly evolves toward job-based entrepreneurship in the freelance, contracting and gig economies, it’s becoming increasingly important for recruitment, contracting and staffing businesses to keep up to date with competition & consumer law developments that impact their sector and their incorporated workers.

In this free session,  Andrew C. Wood will present a short briefing to business owners & managers, consultants and contractors about the role of the ACCC in creating and supporting a fair and level playing field.

Andrew will cover the following topics:

  • Authorisations and protective notifications
  • Banning orders, penalties & remedies
  • Cartel prohibitions
  • Collective bargaining and the proposed small business class exemption
  • Misleading job ads
  • Statutory guarantees and unlawful attempts at exclusion
  • Unconscionable conduct
  • Unfair standard form, small business contracts
  • Unsolicited services (and claims for payment).

Register Now

 

Webinar 2

Transaction to Transformation

Friday, 28 September 2018, 10.00 am to 10.30 am AEST.

Modern Universal Business Concept Icon SetThe “factory model” of services production and supply, based on efficiency in repeating similar transactions has been disrupted by Artificial Intelligence. Astute suppliers in the recruitment, contracting & staffing industry are already talking about a major shift from transaction to transformation.

But what does that look like? How is it managed? How is progress measured? How is it supported by business models and the terms and conditions that underpin them? And is the transaction still important?

In this free introductory level webinar that has been designed for recruitment, contracting & staffing agency business owners and managers, we will begin to explore some of these questions and set a pathway for future discussion.

Register Now

Please send a shout out to your friends and colleagues. We look forward to seeing you there!

MegaMan

 

Andrew C. Wood

Qld Treasury Consultation Papers on Regulations to Support Labour Hire Licensing Act: Quick Observations

Queensland Treasury has just released two consultation papers on the regulations to support that State’s Labour Hire Licensing Act 2017.

One paper deals with operational issues (including the fit and proper person test and reporting); the other is about coverage and exclusions.

Looks like there needs to be some work done; and that an attempt will be made to resolve with policy what can’t be resolved by regulations.

Coverage problems are now surfacing; and the consultation papers are still strangely silent on anything much to do with licence conditions.

Licence fees range between $1,000 and $5,000.

Reporting requirements may be expanded – but, it would be a good idea to start with a clear statement of why the government needs additional (including confidential) information; how it proposes to handle it; and what it proposes to do with it.

Some regulatory solutions to the challenges posed by a hastily assembled Act seem possible; but they will not be easy to achieve. Internal labour hire within corporate groups is proving to be “particularly problematic”, as the government tries to work itself out of a tight corner.

Submissions are due by 2 February 2018.

You can read about the release and find the consultation papers here.

https://www.treasury.qld.gov.au/fair-and-safe-work/industrial-relations/regulation-labour-hire-industry/consultation-labour-hire-licensing-act/

Businessman & Newspaper

Andrew C. Wood