Let’s Shed Light on Recruitment Fees!

 

Slide1Temp-to-Perm Fees, Agency-Switching Fees, Introduction Fees and Release Fees.

I hope you’ll join me when we shed light on the topic of Recruitment Fees in two separate webinars planned for Thursday 22nd November and Thursday 29th November at 10:30 am AEDT.

In our first webinar, you’ll learn how to make binding and enforceable recruitment fee agreements.

In our second webinar, you’ll learn how to manage fee recruitment disputes ethically and professionally.

You can find out more about the webinars in my Recruiters’ Casebook blog here.

 

Andrew C. Wood, Hon FRCSA (Life)

Two Webinars about Recruitment Fees

I’m looking forward to presenting two webinars on recruitment fee topics later this month. I’m looking forward to it because it’s a topic that I’m constantly asked about and one that needs to be mastered in the interests of promoting and maintaining professional standards in the recruitment and staffing industry.

Slide1Webinar #1: Make Binding & Effective Agreements (22nd Nov. 2019 )

In the first session, we will discuss how to make binding and effective recruitment fee agreements that will reduce the cost of disputes and help get your fees paid.

You’ll learn about:

  • basics of contract
  • the battle of forms – Does the client’s purchase order trump your standard terms?
  • traps when using standard form terms of business
  • State and Territory employment agent regulation
  • what happens if your terms of business are not signed?
  • terms of business that need special treatment.

 

RF2Webinar #2: Handle Disputes Ethically & Professionally (29th Nov. 2019)

In the second session, you will learn how to handle recruitment fee disputes professionally and ethically to preserve goodwill, reputation, and to improve payment outcomes.

You’ll learn about:

  • common causes of recruitment fee disputes
  • common defences to recruitment fee claims
  • traps to avoid when involved in disputes
  • RCSA Code of Conduct and Grievance Intervention Guidelines
  • pathways to resolution
  • the benefit of early intervention.

 

I hope you’ll join me. And if you have questions about the topic, please feel free to send them to me ahead of the event.

 

Andrew C. Wood, Hon FRCSA (Life)

 

 

 

Gender & Intersectional Identity in Grievance Intervention & Professional Conduct Review

My Post-Law transition is leading me into deeper reflection about the work that I do in the field of professional conduct grievance intervention, and I’d really like to get some feedback on an issue I’m grappling with at the moment.

Many professional conduct review programmes allow grievants to request anonymity or pseudonymity when their grievances escalate to a professional conduct review panel. No problem with that. It protects privacy and allays fears of victimisation.  But here’s the thing…

It’s considered good practice to redact all identifying information. Typically, I’d redact name, address, contact details… that sort of thing.  It’s also common to redact gender identifying pronouns – his/her; she/he. And that’s what I’m wondering about.

By redacting gender identifying pronouns, might we be erasing something significant? Are there gender or other intersectional overlays to conflicts that should be preserved? I don’t mean in discrimination complaints – gender identity is clearly a material issue there – but in other cases, for example, cases involving more subtle power imbalances between parties to a grievance that might colour conduct that could be characterised as bullying, unprofessional, or disrespectful?

My present thought is that it might be best to let the parties choose whether they want to disclose their gender identity – with the assistance of an explanation about why it could be significant in the circumstances of their grievance.

So, if you were sitting on a professional conduct review panel, are there cases where you would be assisted by knowing the gender identity of the parties? And if so, what sort of cases might they be?

I’d really like to hear your views.

 

Andrew C. Wood