Who’s in charge? Independent contractors and the unfair terms in small business contracts reforms.

On 12 November 2016, what has been described as “the single biggest change in the way Australian enterprises do business for decades.”[1] took place.

Judging from the lack of registrations at one industry association workshop[2], there may be reason to think that it might have passed in some sectors of the recruitment and contracting industry without too much notice[3]. That is a pity because, amongst the seven industry sectors that the ACCC has been viewing closely as it prepares to administer the reforms, is the independent contracting sector.

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The Unfair Contracts Legislation: Threat, Challenge, or Opportunity?

Now that we have passed 12 November 2016, when the unfair terms in standard form small business contracts reforms commenced, recruitment, on-hire and contracting agencies might consider how they can adjust to the changes; and might ask themselves whether the changes present a threat, a challenge, or an opportunity. They might be all those things. And, for a few, they might also be an invitation to do something amazing.

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Checking for Unfair Terms in Standard Form Small Business Contracts.

With less than eight weeks to go before the unfair terms in standard form small business contracts changes to the Australian Consumer Law take effect, the Recruiters Casebook outlines steps that recruitment, contracting and on-hire agencies might take to avoid being caught out after the commencement date on 12 November 2016.

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Unfair terms in standard form small business contracts in the independent contracting sector – First questions.

With only eight weeks to go until the unfair terms in standard form small business contracts reforms take effect on 12 November 2016, and with the ACCC having indicated that the independent contracting sector is clearly in its sights[1], I am hoping that someone is looking at how this is going to play out for independent contractors and their principals in the recruitment, on-hire, and contracting industries. 

I might be about to ask more questions than I can answer; but let me ask them anyway and see if they bring a few issues into sharper focus.

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10 things you should probably know about the interaction between candidate replacement guarantees and Australian statutory consumer guarantees

guaranteed-434x640Talking about Candidate Replacement Guarantees

In Brisbane recently, I had an opportunity to speak with recruiters about their terms of business. We got to talking about candidate replacement guarantees and some of the challenges that they present.

Often recruitment agencies put forward their candidate guarantees as a competitive point of difference; but after a while they begin to look pretty much the same.

One thing intrigued me. It was the idea that a competitive point of difference could be based upon what, from a client’s perspective at least, might be viewed as a service failure.

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Recruitment, Contracting and On-Hire Agencies: Still time to weed out suspect unfair terms!

justiceTaking stock

From 12 November, 2016 the Australian Consumer Law will provide that a term of a small business contract is void if:

  • the term is unfair; and
  • the contract is a standard form contract.

The Recruiters Casebook has been exploring each of these key expressions as we prepare for the 12 November reform commencement date.

So far, we’ve looked at the definition of small business contract. A contract is a small business contract if it meets both a headcount requirement and an upfront price requirement.

We have already considered the headcount requirement (fewer than 20 employee) and the upfront price requirement (not more than $300,000 or $1 million if the duration of the contract is more than 12 months).

In our last article, we identified some recruitment, on-hire and contracting agency contracts that you might regularly use, which might be standard form contracts and took a closer look at how a court would decide if they actually are standard form contracts.

Standard form contracts that are often used by recruitment, on-hire and contacting agencies could be:

  • terms of business under which you supply services to clients;
  • terms of business under which you acquire goods, services or property interests (e.g. a commercial lease) from third parties;
  • terms of business with your independent contractors – because they’re contracts for services;
  • candidate or work seeker registration agreements – because you are supplying agency or representation services – even though the candidates or work seekers might not actually be engaged or might be between assignments.

In this article you will learn how to recognise terms of standard form contracts that might be unfair and how a court would decide if they actually were unfair. Continue reading

Recruitment, Contracting & On-Hire Agencies: Get ready. Your “standard form contracts” are whatever another person says they are!

 

From 12 November, 2016 the Australian Consumer Law will provide that a term of a small business contract is void if:

  • the term is unfair; and
  • the contract is a standard form contract.

We are exploring each of these key expressions as we prepare for the 12 November reform commencement date. So far, we have looked at the definition of small business contract. A contract is a small business contract if it meets both a headcount requirement and an upfront price requirement. We have already considered the headcount requirement and the upfront price requirement.

Let’s see if we can identify some contracts that you might regularly use, which might be standard form contracts. Then we’ll take a closer look at how a court would decide if they actually are standard form contracts.

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Recruitment, On-Hire & Contracting Agencies: A closer look at the upfront price provisions of the unfair terms in standard form small business contracts reforms.

Teacher 3From 12 November, 2016 the Australian Consumer Law will provide that a term of a small business contract is void if:

  • the term is unfair; and
  • the contract is a standard form contract.

We are exploring each of these key expressions as we prepare for the 12 November reform commencement date. So far, we have been looking at the definition of small business contract. A contract is a small business contract if it meets both a headcount requirement[1] and an upfront price requirement.  We have already considered the headcount requirement; let’s now examine the upfront price requirement.

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7 Market-Driven Features of the Fels Wage Fairness Panel Inquiry into the 7-Eleven Franchise

For anyone who might be looking for evidence of the effectiveness of market-driven initiatives in tackling labour exploitation, seven features of the Fels’ Panel inquiry into wage fairness within the Australian 7-Eleven franchise are worth noting. Continue reading

Tackling Labour Market Exploitation: Are industry and regulatory codes of conduct sufficient?

Of course not! It would be naive as to suggest that they are. Nevertheless, they are vital to the success of a comprehensive strategy in tackling labour market exploitation. Three characteristics of labour market exploitation suggest reasons why that is so. Continue reading