The Recruiters’ Casebook and WorkAccord Get Together for a Free Short Webinar Series

The Recruiters’ Casebook and WorkAccord are getting together to present two free webinars as they test their new webinar platform.

We’d love you to join us and give us your feedback.

Webinar 1

Competition & Consumer Law Brief – The New Playing Field.

Friday, 21 September 2018, 10.00 am to 10.30 am AEST.

Modern Universal Business Concept Icon SetAs job-based employment seemingly evolves toward job-based entrepreneurship in the freelance, contracting and gig economies, it’s becoming increasingly important for recruitment, contracting and staffing businesses to keep up to date with competition & consumer law developments that impact their sector and their incorporated workers.

In this free session,  Andrew C. Wood will present a short briefing to business owners & managers, consultants and contractors about the role of the ACCC in creating and supporting a fair and level playing field.

Andrew will cover the following topics:

  • Authorisations and protective notifications
  • Banning orders, penalties & remedies
  • Cartel prohibitions
  • Collective bargaining and the proposed small business class exemption
  • Misleading job ads
  • Statutory guarantees and unlawful attempts at exclusion
  • Unconscionable conduct
  • Unfair standard form, small business contracts
  • Unsolicited services (and claims for payment).

Register Now

 

Webinar 2

Transaction to Transformation

Friday, 28 September 2018, 10.00 am to 10.30 am AEST.

Modern Universal Business Concept Icon SetThe “factory model” of services production and supply, based on efficiency in repeating similar transactions has been disrupted by Artificial Intelligence. Astute suppliers in the recruitment, contracting & staffing industry are already talking about a major shift from transaction to transformation.

But what does that look like? How is it managed? How is progress measured? How is it supported by business models and the terms and conditions that underpin them? And is the transaction still important?

In this free introductory level webinar that has been designed for recruitment, contracting & staffing agency business owners and managers, we will begin to explore some of these questions and set a pathway for future discussion.

Register Now

Please send a shout out to your friends and colleagues. We look forward to seeing you there!

MegaMan

 

Andrew C. Wood

Three States of Accord (and its Opposite)

Close up of Business people shaking hands, finishing up meeting, business etiquette, congratulation, merger and acquisition conceptMuch of my work, when I am rehabilitating parties’ terms of business,  requires me to reflect on the nature and quality of their agreement (and its opposite). We are often taught that agreement is good and that disagreement or conflict is bad. However, adopting an accord-centred approach, it seems possible to reflect a little more deeply.

Accord =   the relational aspect of agreement. Often overlooked in traditional contract making, it represents the heart and spirit of the parties’ agreement – their shared and separate hopes – the ‘what’ and the ‘why’ of their commitments in ways that also authentically represent the “who”.

Discord = active disagreement, often manifesting in open conflict and disputes – but sometimes containing the potential for accord in narratives thickened around threads of the “absent-but-implicit”.

Dys-cord = unhealthy agreement, the illusion of agreement, often reflecting power imbalances – may represent the compromise that everyone is unhappy with – might also represent the type of “one-up” approach to contract-making and negotiating that tips the parties towards conflict and bickering over the contract at the first upset. Although dys-cordant agreements can be legally enforceable, they often leave the parties with a lingering sense of discontent and distrust that may lead to non-co-operation and eventually undermine their true “loyalty to the bargain”. Dys-cordant agreements are inclined to “leave value on the table” – especially intangible value.

I wonder how much of what passes for agreement is something less than true accord? And how, as collaborative lawyers, we can use our skills to help our parties resolve discord and make healthier agreements.

Andrew C. Wood