Supply Chain Conversation #4: Certification Coverage – “Who’s in; who’s out?”

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In this, the fourth installment in our current series of Supply Chain Conversations, during which RCSA’s CEO, Charles Cameron, has been posing a number of questions about the involvement of workforce services firms in supply chains, we examine the coverage of RCSA’s Certification Program, looking at some non-traditional labour supply arrangements and asking, “Who’s in; who’s out”.

 

CHARLES: Andrew, I have some examples of non-traditional labour supply arrangements in Australia and New Zealand.  Can you describe how, under the RCSA certification model you have devised, each would be covered, if at all? Continue reading

Supply Chain Conversation #3: Supply chain labour governance and certification.

conversation-3-_22119259_5e71cc57f3ba272e61ac1c66d01c5d2482cb9abcRCSA’s CEO, Charles Cameron, has been posing a number of questions about supply chains for me, lately. In this series of Supply Chain Conversations, we explore the involvement of recruitment and workforce services firms in supply chain operations.

Our third conversation reveals how certification of workforce services providers, who exercise good stewardship over their service value networks, can contribute to better supply chain labour governance and trigger a collaborative “race to the top” that harnesses the power to convert a supply chain, one link at a time.

CHARLES: RCSA is currently developing a certification program to make it easier to make clean and ethical workforce services buying decisions which, in turn, will force change in the market by ensuring unethical and non-compliant providers don’t win work.  This program incorporates the concept of a ‘service network’, where workforce services providers are part of a ‘service network’ and have to use their control or influence to enhance supply chain labour governance.  Can you explain how this would work? Continue reading